Lindsey Turnbullet: The Multi-Tasking Goddess

Written on

March 25, 2015

Lindsey is a pretty cool, albeit busy, woman that I met by chance years ago. She wasn’t involved in as many projects as she is now, but the ones I have always known her for were The Scrapyard Magazine and Miss Heard Magazine. She also kindly donated an article to BoL last year. So, if you are one of her fans or friends that has trouble keeping up with her, here is your chance to catch a glimpse of her world. As always, I hope that you enjoy the read.

Question

Ok. Lindsey. You are a writer and a big promoter of music. What is it exactly that you have your hands in in that regard?

Answer

What don't I have my hands in? Haha. I'm kidding, really. I (sporadically) write a blog- interviews, reviews and little articles about things I find at the record label where I am currently employed. Sometimes I review stuff for Violent Resonance and write trivia for SkullToaster. I've dipped my toe into doing PR when I helped promote my friend's festival- Southern Darkness Festival. For fun, I sell merch on the 70,000 Tons of MetalCruise.

Question

Pretty cool. What lucky label are you are currently employed for and how did that come about?

Answer

I work for an indie/avant garde jazz label called Cuneiform Records. The same people run a distro called Wayside Music. Actually, I happened into that job. My boyfriend knows someone who works there and his assistant was quitting. I was previously walking dogs and couldn't suffer though another winter (plus I was bored out of my mind), so I jumped on the job.

Question

Dog walker. I love dogs, but the job just seems...boring, as you put it. You also have your own magazine. Missheard. What is the mission behind that?

Answer

It is boring, haha. After a year and a half, I needed to move on. As for MissHeard, in college I worked with teen girls as part of a mentoring program. The girls I interacted with were so witty, so thoughtful, and so inspiring. I wished they had more outlets where they could share and learn from one another. After I finished grad school, I found myself with a lot of time on my hands so I decided I was going to hatch this baby idea I had been incubating over the previous three years, so MissHeard was born.

Question

How has it been doing since then? What plans do you have for it in the future?

Answer

It's good, but it's a challenge. Building your own business is hard. I work at Wayside, plus do this and it seems like there's never enough time in the day. I am the only employee and while I have some people who help me, I am ultimately responsible for the: content managing and creation, recruiting writers, editing, laying out the actual issues, PR, social media, planning for the future (event, workshops etc).

It can be so rewarding and so overwhelming. At the same time, I try not to get tunnel vision- cause I live with it all day every day. This means I am always bugging people for new ideas and to be soundboards, haha. As for the future, we have three more issues coming out as well as four free mini issues, plus hopefully we'll be hosting some workshops with comunity partners.

Question

Future looking bright for it then. I know how it is being the only employee of a pet project. What got you into writing in the first place?

Answer

It's totally exhausting, haha. Great though. I think I always wrote. As a kid I wrote in my crummy diary. I took writing classes in high school, got praised by my teachers. The Scrapyard zine was something I started when I was about 15, still in high school. I just like to mouth off, so putting a pen in m hand (or computer in front of me) seems natural. I wish I had more time to write, like, novels or something, but that'll come eventually.

Question

It is a natural progression that will happen eventually. What made you start The Scrapyard Zine and what was its main focus, if any at all?

Answer

I started it because- much like MissHeard- I thought the mainstream options were lacking. I loved music and I was super hyped on music my friends were making and I wanted an outlet to share that stuff. I couldn't easily find one at the time, so I made one myself.

Question

DIY! The article you contributed to BoL highlighted something interesting. It took things into the realm of female fandom. Something that is lacking in most fringe music publications. We are still side pieces in many ways if we are not the ones on stage. Do you make a point of writing articles like that or does it does naturally come out that way?

Answer

It was more organic, nothing really pointed or planned. I read something, thought about my experiences and was inspired. The article you're referring to (Getting Over Girl Hate[/u8rl]) was something that I had been thinking about for a LONG time. It was actually kind of embarassing to write- to admit that I bought into some of the myths perpetuated about women in metal. Ugh.

Question

It happens to the best of us in all areas of life. What are some of the most memorable meetings that you have made which blossomed into life-long friendships?

Answer

Haha, wow. That's a good question. I've traveled all over going to shows and fests and I try really hard to keep up with all the people I hit it off with. Social media makes that easier. I still follow the band of someone I met at Party San in 2008. On the cruise this year, I hung out with my friend from New Zealand i met by chance at a show- and I hadn't seen him in probably 7 years. Some of the friendships I've made were unlikely. I was not doing so well when I moved cross-country and I reached out to a lot of people....some surprising ones let me cling to them for dear life, and I'm eternally grateful.

Question

Always a wonderful thing. How about people you have admired from afar and had a chance to meet?

Answer

Oh there's a lot, probably too many to name. At MDF two years ago, I got to meet Ihsahn through my friend, Hakon, who is Ihsahn's manager. I have been an Ihsahn fan since I was about 14, so that was amazing. Also, Dax Riggs. I am largely obsessed with Dax Riggs and I've had the pleasure to meet him twice. I never have anything cool to say though, which is kind of a bummer.

It was also a pleasant surprise to meet Attila. I just sort of assumed he'd be unfriendly, but he was very polite (and extremely well dressed). Plus working on the 70K cruise means I get to have a lot of boring conversations with very interesting people, haha (Hey guys,here's when you pick up your merch!)

Question

Lucky...I am always too shy to approach unless I have some business to do with them. Haha! Nice. How do you feel your mindset has changed about music, and life in general, after getting entrenched in the music industry?

Answer

I still wouldn't say I'm entrenched in the music industry. I think I have a pretty solid grasp on what the industry entails, but I would say I'm more of a spectator than a participant. Music is like the best friend you could ever want. There's always more to discover, it's there when you're bummed, it pumps you up before important shit...I really love music and the passion and skill (sometimes lack thereof) involved in making it.

I think though, there's something to be said about metal news sites that "report" on drama for the sake of increasing hit counts. To me it's bizarre that: 1) anyone cares what some dude from a band said to another dude in a band and, 2) that it is also newsworthy. I think it sort of takes away of some of the mystique.

On the plus side, it also lets you know who is an asshole.

Question

People love drama. That is one constant in human nature and there are always those who will capitalize on it. What is one of the scariest things you have witnessed along your travels for music?

Answer

Hrm, scariest? I don't know. I am sure there is something weird, odd, or scary that happened, but nothing sticks out. My most scary memories, I suppose, have to do with men who don't take "no" for an answer at shows.

Question

Have you encountered a lot of that?

Answer

I feel like it's lessened since I'm 1) older and, 2) further north. I think it was a larger and scarier problem when I was young and in the South. Oh, and once some neo-Nazis tried to jump me, but someone tipped me off so I could avoid them. I guess that had scary-potential.

Question

Jeez. I stayed away from most gigs in the south. Have you heard a lot of reports of that kind of thing happening these days in the south?

Answer

I actually don't talk to a ton of people from where I used to live any more, and the ones I do talk to either aren't experiencing that kind of stuff or they don't go to shows that would facilitiate it. A DIY crust punk show in a falling apart bar is not likely to have neo-nazis in attendance. Every now and again I see stuff on Facebook, but I'm kind of out of that loop now.

Question

Hopefully that kind of thing is not as prevelant anymore. Are there are any stray thoughts that you want to share with my five or so readers?

Answer

I am unfortunately sure it is still prevalent, I just don't hear about it anymore as I don't live there.

Hrm, stray thoughts? As much as I love music, I think it's important that people have other interests and are generally well-rounded. I think treating women in music like they're simply groupies or whatever is completely foolish and we should laugh in the faces of sexist men. Laugh, and then slyly sip our whiskey or beer or whatever.

Also, I think 2015 should be the year we get a new Dax record.

Question

I agree on all counts! It was awesome to get a chance to finally interr...interview you. Thank you for your time!

Answer

Thank you, it was fun!


Warning: Illegal string offset 'interview_conclusion' in /home/sarelg/bloodorlovezine.com/wp-content/themes/bolTheme/single-interviews.php on line 46

Founder and Editor. Conquering one genre at a time while blurring the lines. Words are my art and the world my canvas.